59 Lucy Lane

Lucy Filmography

Lucy's career spanned from 1933 through 1974. She appeared in 83 films!

The Bowery
The Bowery is a 1933 American pre-Code comedy and action film about the Lower East Side of Manhattan around the start of the 20th century directed by Raoul Walsh and starring Wallace Beery and George Raft. The supporting cast features Jackie Cooper, Fay Wray, and Pert Kelton.
Broadway Through a Keyhole, also billed as Broadway Thru a Keyhole, is a 1933 American pre-Code musical film produced by Twentieth Century Pictures and released by United Artists. New York City speakeasy proprietress Texas Guinan appears as a fictionalized version of herself in the film. It also features early appearances by Lucille Ball, Ann Sothern, and Susan Fleming. The film is based on an original story by Broadway columnist Walter Winchell.
Broadway Through a Keyhole
Blood Money
Blood Money is a 1933 American Pre-Code crime drama about a crooked bail bondsman named Bill Bailey, played by George Bancroft, with Chick Chandler as crime boss Drury Darling, Judith Anderson as Drury's sister and Bailey's lover, and Frances Dee as a thrill-seeking, larcenous beauty who fatefully catches Bailey's eye. The film was considered to be lost for nearly forty years before reappearing.
Roman Scandals is a 1933 American black-and-white pre-Code musical film starring Eddie Cantor, Ruth Etting, Gloria Stuart, Edward Arnold and David Manners. It was directed by Frank Tuttle. The film features a number of intricate production numbers choreographed by Busby Berkeley. The song "Keep Young and Beautiful" is from this film. In addition to the starring actors in the picture, the elaborate dance numbers are performed by the "Goldwyn Girls" (who in this film include future stars such as Lucille Ball, Paulette Goddard and Barbara Pepper). The title of the film is a pun on Roman sandals.
Roman Scandals
Moulin Rouge
Moulin Rouge[1] (French pronunciation: ​[mu.lɛ̃ ʁuʒ], French for "Red Mill") is a cabaret in Paris, France. The original house, which burned down in 1915, was co-founded in 1889 by Charles Zidler and Joseph Oller, who also owned the Paris Olympia. Close to Montmartre in the Paris district of Pigalle on Boulevard de Clichy in the 18th arrondissement, it is marked by the red windmill on its roof. The closest métro station is Blanche.
Nana is a 1934 American pre-Code film, produced by Samuel Goldwyn, released through United Artists, starring Anna Sten. and directed by Dorothy Arzner and George Fitzmaurice. This version of Émile Zola's heroine was to be the vehicle for Sten's triumph as Samuel Goldwyn's trained, groomed and heavily promoted answer to Greta Garbo. Despite a record-breaking opening week at Radio City Music Hall, Sten was beautiful but disappointing
Nana
Hold That Girl
Hold That Girl is a 1934 American comedy film directed by Hamilton MacFadden and written by Dudley Nichols and Lamar Trotti. The film stars James Dunn, Claire Trevor, Alan Edwards, Gertrude Michael, John Davidson and Robert McWade. The film was released on March 24, 1934, by Fox Film Corporation.
Bottoms Up is a 1934 American pre-Code musical comedy film made by Fox Film Corporation, and was directed by David Butler who co-wrote original story and screenplay with producer Buddy G. DeSylva and co-star Sid Silvers. The picture stars Spencer Tracy, Pat Paterson, John Boles and Herbert Mundin, and features Thelma Todd in a supporting role.
Bottoms Up
Murder at the Vanities
Murder at the Vanities is a 1934 American Pre-Code musical film based on the 1933 Broadway musical with music by Victor Young. It was released by Paramount Pictures. It was directed by Mitchell Leisen, stars Victor McLaglen, Carl Brisson, Jack Oakie, Kitty Carlisle, Gertrude Michael, Toby Wing, and Jessie Ralph. Duke Ellington and his Orchestra are featured in the elaborate finale number.
Bulldog Drummond Strikes Back is a 1934 American comedy-mystery-adventure film directed by Roy Del Ruth. The film stars Ronald Colman and Loretta Young. It was a loose sequel to the 1929 film Bulldog Drummond which had also starred Colman.
Bulldog Drummond Strikes Back
The Affairs of Cellini
The Affairs of Cellini (1934) is a comedy film set in Florence over 400 years ago. This film was adapted by Bess Meredyth from the play The Firebrand of Florence by Edwin Justus Mayer. It was directed by Gregory La Cava.
Kid Millions (1934) is an American musical film directed by Roy Del Ruth, produced by Samuel Goldwyn Productions, and starring Eddie Cantor. Its elaborate "Ice Cream Fantasy Finale" production number was filmed in three-strip Technicolor, one of the earliest uses of that process in a feature-length film.
Kid Millions
Men of the Night
Men of the Night is a 1934 American drama film written and directed by Lambert Hillyer, which stars Bruce Cabot, Judith Allen, and Ward Bond.
Broadway Bill is a 1934 American comedy drama film directed by Frank Capra and starring Warner Baxter, Myrna Loy, Walter Connolly, and Helen Vinson. Written by Robert Riskin and based on the short story "Strictly Confidential" by Mark Hellinger, the film is about a man's love for his thoroughbred race horse and the woman who helps him achieve his dreams. Capra disliked the final product, and in an effort to make it more to his liking, he remade the film in 1950 as Riding High. In later years, the distributor of Riding High, Paramount Pictures, acquired the rights to Broadway Bill. The film was released in the United Kingdom as Strictly Confidential
Broadway Bill
Jealousy
1934 - Larry O'Roark is a boxer who's insanely posssesive and jealous of his fiancee, Jo. the sight of her and her employer, Mr. Lambert, at ringside during his big fight distracts Larry and he is knocked out. He then promises never to be jealous again and marries Jo. When she realizes that they're broke she asks Lambert for a job (she had quit on marrying Larry.) One thing leads to another and Larry, enraged with jealousy, end up killing Lambert. He then wanders off in a daze, and Jo takes the rap for the murder. Larry descends from his amnesiac fog just in time to interrupt the announcement of the jury's verdict in Jo's trial. then it's off to the chair for Larry. Or is it?
1934 - When the beautiful Ann Duncan loses her job, she finally accepts Jack Howard's marriage proposal and agrees to elope with him. Ann is soon made aware of Jack's criminal past when Jack flees from the police and she is caught in possession of his stolen goods and sent to prison. The train transporting Ann to the prison wrecks, and she is mistaken for Mrs. Howard, one of the killed passengers, who was on her way to meet her mother-in-law for the first time. Ann is taken to the home of Donald Howard, where she tells Donald and his mother what has happened.
Fugitive Lady
Behind the Evidence
1935 - Norman Foster plays a millionaire who takes a job as a reporter after he's wiped out in the Stock Market. Foster's managing editor Samuel S. Hinds considers the young upstart to be a pain in the neck. But all is forgiven-at least until next time-when Foster solves a series of puzzling robberies..
1935 - "Chick" Thompson is a puppet-master in a traveling carnival whose wife dies in childbirth and leaves him with an infant son he names "Poochy." His father-in-law and the baby's grandfather sues him for custody of the baby and Chick takes his son and hides out for a couple of years. He joins his former assistants, Daisy and "Fingers", in a circus act only to find that the persistent grandfather is still on his trail.
Carnival
The Whole Town's Talking
The Whole Town's Talking (released in the UK as Passport to Fame) is a 1935 American comedy film starring Edward G. Robinson as a law-abiding man who bears a striking resemblance to a killer, with Jean Arthur as his love interest. It was directed by John Ford from a screenplay by Jo Swerling and Robert Riskin based on a story by W.R. Burnett originally published in Collier's in August 1932.[1] Burnett was also the author of the source material for Robinson's screen break-through, Little Caesar. The film The Whole Town's Talking (1926) has no story connection to this film. The story was remade in 1998 as the Bollywood film Duplicate.
Roberta is a 1935 musical film by RKO starring Irene Dunne, Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, and Randolph Scott. It was an adaptation of a 1933 Broadway musical Roberta, which in turn was based on the novel Gowns by Roberta by Alice Duer Miller. It was a solid hit, showing a net profit of more than three-quarters of a million dollars
Roberta
I'll Love You Always
1935 - Nora Clegg, an actress, marries Carl Brent, an unemployed young engineer, whose estimation of his worth and ability keeps him from getting a job. He finally acquires a position that will require him to go to Russia for a period of time, while Nora goes back to the stage during his absence. But he loses out on the job at the last minute, and rather than tell Nora he has failed again, he steals a roll of money from his prospective employer to buy some things for Nora and go out and have a good time before, she things, his departure.
Old Man Rhythm is a 1935 American musical film about a businessman who enrolls as a college freshman in order to break up his son's relationship with a gold-digger.
Old Man Rhythm
Top Hat
Top Hat is a 1935 American screwball musical comedy film in which Fred Astaire plays an American dancer named Jerry Travers, who comes to London to star in a show produced by Horace Hardwick (Edward Everett Horton). He meets and attempts to impress Dale Tremont (Ginger Rogers) to win her affection. The film also features Eric Blore as Hardwick's valet Bates, Erik Rhodes as Alberto Beddini, a fashion designer and rival for Dale's affections, and Helen Broderick as Hardwick's long-suffering wife Madge.
The Three Musketeers is a 1935 film directed by Rowland V. Lee and starring Walter Abel, Heather Angel, Ian Keith, Margot Grahame, and Paul Lukas. It is the first English-language talking picture version of Alexandre Dumas's novel The Three Musketeers.
The Three Musketeers
I Dream Too Much
I Dream Too Much is a 1935 American romantic comedy film directed by John Cromwell. It stars Henry Fonda, Lily Pons, and Lucille Ball in one of her earliest roles. It has been described as a "somewhat wispy operetta."[2] Songs are by Jerome Kern and Dorothy Fields. The film was nominated for an Academy Award in the category Sound Recording (Carl Dreher).[3]
1939 - Radio sensation Kay Kyser and his band are lured to Hollywood to make a movie, but the screenwriters assigned to the project have difficulty tailoring a script to Kyser's persona.
Chatterbox
Muss 'em Up
Muss 'Em Up is a 1936 American detective drama film directed by Charles Vidor from a screenplay by Erwin Gelsey. RKO Radio pictures premiered the film in New York City on February 1, 1936, with a nationwide opening on February 14. The film stars Preston Foster and Margaret Callahan, with a supporting cast which includes Alan Mowbray, Ralph Morgan, Big Boy Williams, and Maxie Rosenbloom.
Muss 'Em Up is a 1936 American detective drama film directed by Charles Vidor from a screenplay by Erwin Gelsey. RKO Radio pictures premiered the film in New York City on February 1, 1936, with a nationwide opening on February 14. The film stars Preston Foster and Margaret Callahan, with a supporting cast which includes Alan Mowbray, Ralph Morgan, Big Boy Williams, and Maxie Rosenbloom.
Follow the Fleet
The Farmer in the Dell
The Farmer in the Dell is a 1936 American comedy film directed by Ben Holmes from a screenplay by Sam Mintz and John Grey, adapted from Phil Stong's 1935 novel, which was similarly titled, Farmer in the Dell. The film was premiered by RKO Radio Pictures in New York City on March 6, 1936, and released widely later that month on March 27. It stars Fred Stone (making his film debut), Jean Parker, and Esther Dale.
Bunker Bean is a 1936 American black-and-white comedy film adapted from a novel by Harry Leon Wilson. It was directed by William Hamilton and Edward Killy, produced by William Sistrom starring Owen Davis, Jr. as the title character. The cast included Lucille Ball as Mrs Kelly.
Bunker Bean
Winterset
Winterset - 1936. Immigrant radical Bartolomeo Romagna is falsely condemned and executed for a payroll robbery. Years later, his son Mio sets out to find the truth of the crime and to bring to account the gangster Trock Estrella.
1936 - Nikki Martin, a parisian opera star, takes off in search of adventure and true-love leaving her arranged husband to be at the alter. While hitchhiking, Nikki meets handsome American musician, Windy McLean and his band the 'McLean Wildcats'. Windy immediately spites her, but Nikki falls in love with him and follows him to New York by stowing away on the ship his on. The steward finds her hiding in Windy and the Wilcats room...
That Girl from Paris
Don't Tell the Wife
Don't Tell the Wife is a 1937 American comedy film directed by Christy Cabanne using a screenplay by Nat Perrin adapted from the play, Once Over Lightly, written by George Holland. The film stars Guy Kibbee, Una Merkel, and Lynne Overman, with Lucille Ball, William Demarest, and Academy Award winner Hattie McDaniel in supporting roles. Produced by RKO Radio Pictures, it premiered in New York City on February 18, 1937, and was released nationwide on March 5.
There Goes My Girl is a 1937 American comedy film directed by Ben Holmes, written by Harry Segall, and starring Gene Raymond, Ann Sothern, Gordon Jones, Richard Lane, Frank Jenks and Bradley Page. It was released on May 21, 1937, by RKO Pictures.
There Goes My Girl
Stage Door
Stage Door is a 1937 RKO film directed by Gregory La Cava. Adapted from the play of the same name, it tells the story of several would-be actresses who live together in a boarding house at 158 West 58th Street in New York City. The film stars Katharine Hepburn, Ginger Rogers, Adolphe Menjou, Gail Patrick, Constance Collier, Andrea Leeds, Samuel S. Hinds and Lucille Ball. Eve Arden and Ann Miller, who became notable in later films, play minor characters.
Go Chase Yourself is a 1938 American comedy film directed by Edward F. Cline and written by Paul Yawitz and Bert Granet. The film stars Joe Penner, Lucille Ball, Richard Lane, June Travis, Fritz Feld and Tom Kennedy. The film was released on April 22, 1938, by RKO Pictures.
Go Chase Yourself
Joy of Living
Joy of Living is a 1938 film starring Irene Dunne and Douglas Fairbanks Jr. with supporting performances from Alice Brady, Guy Kibbee, Jean Dixon, Eric Blore and Lucille Ball. It features the hit song "You Couldn't Be Cuter," written by Jerome Kern and Dorothy Fields.
Having Wonderful Time is a 1938 romantic comedy film released by RKO Radio Pictures. Bored New York office girl Teddy goes to a vacation camp in the Catskill Mountains called Camp Kare Free, for rest and to get away from the noisy, busy, city life and avoid advances from Emil. She meets and at first does not like waiter Chick. She also meets friend Fay, her roommate Miriam, and Buzzy. Miriam has eyes for Buzzy, who seems to have eyes for everyone. Within her two-week stay, Teddy and Chick fall in love and spend every day together.
Having Wonderful Time
The Affairs of Annabel
The Affairs of Annabel is a 1938 comedy starring Lucille Ball and Jack Oakie. Oakie plays Lannie Morgan, Wonder Pictures publicity man working with film star Annabel Allison (Ball), her first starring comedy role.
Room Service is a 1938 RKO film comedy directed by William A. Seiter, based on the 1937 play of the same name by Allen Boretz and John Murray. The film stars the Marx Brothers and also features Lucille Ball, Ann Miller, Alexander Asro, and Frank Albertson. This is the only Marx Bros. film that was not written especially for the team. Less frenetic and more physically contained than their other movies, the plot revolves around the shenanigans of getting a stage play produced and funded by mysterious backer Zachary Fisk, while evading paying a large hotel bill.
Room Service
Next Time I Marry
Next Time I Marry is a 1938 American comedy film directed by Garson Kanin and written by John Twist and Helen Meinardi. The film stars Lucille Ball, James Ellison, Lee Bowman, Granville Bates and Mantan Moreland. The film was released on December 9, 1938, by RKO Pictures.
Beauty for the Asking is a 1939 film drama produced by RKO Pictures, and starring Lucille Ball and Patric Knowles. It tells the story of Jean Russell (Ball), who becomes romantically involved with a wealthy married man (Knowles) who later spurns her. She later invents a new facial cream, and with the financial backing of her former lover's wife (Frieda Inescort), starts a business that makes her a millionaire.
Beauty for the Asking
Twelve Crowded Hours
Twelve Crowded Hours is a 1939 film directed by Lew Landers and starring Richard Dix and Lucille Ball. When the brother of his girlfriend Paula Sanders is accused of murder, reporter Nick Green tries to clear him. He suspects gangster George Costain of the crime. Nick steals a satchel of Costain's policy racket receipts, placing his life and Paula's in great danger.
Panama Lady is a 1939 film starring Lucille Ball. Panama Lady is a cleaned-up remake of the 1932 Helen Twelvetrees film vehicle Panama Flo. Lucille Ball essays the old Twelvetrees role as Lucy, a nightclub "hostess" stranded in Panama by her ex-lover Roy (Donald Briggs). Victimized by a shakedown orchestrated by Roy, oil rigger McTeague (Allan Lane) holds Lucy responsible. To avoid landing in jail, Lucy agrees to accompany McTeague to his oil camp as his housekeeper. Assuming she's been brought to this godforsaken spot strictly for illicit purposes, Lucy eventually realizes that McTeague's intentions are honorable: All he wants is his money back, and he expects our heroine to work off the debt on her feet. Ultimately, Lucy and McTeague fall in love, but not before the scurrilous Roy re-enters her life.
Panama Lady
Five Came Back
Five Came Back is a 1939 American black-and-white melodrama from RKO Radio Pictures, produced by Robert Sisk, directed by John Farrow, that stars Chester Morris and Lucille Ball. The film was photographed by cinematographer Nicholas Musuraca, and written by Jerry Cady, Dalton Trumbo, and Nathanael West. Although considered a B movie, the positive notices received by Ball helped launch her as an A-list actress. Five Came Back is considered a precursor of the disaster film genre. In 1948 Five Came Back was remade (differing only in minor details) as the Mexican film Los que volvieron and again in 1956 by producer-director Farrow as Back from Eternity, starring Robert Ryan and Anita Ekberg.
That's Right—You're Wrong is a 1939 American musical film directed by David Butler and released by RKO Radio Pictures. The film stars Kay Kyser and his band, with a cast that included Adolphe Menjou, Lucille Ball, Edward Everett Horton, Roscoe Karns, and Ginny Simms (as herself).
That's Right You're Wrong
The Marines Fly High
The Marines Fly High is a 1940 action film, starring Richard Dix, Chester Morris and Lucille Ball and directed by George Nicholls, Jr. and Benjamin Stoloff from a story by A.C. Edington.
You Can't Fool Your Wife is a 1940 American comedy film directed by Ray McCarey and written by Jerome Cady. The film stars Lucille Ball, James Ellison, Robert Coote, Virginia Vale, Emma Dunn and Elaine Shepard. The film was released on May 21, 1940, by RKO Pictures
You Can't Fool Your Wife
Dance, Girl, Dance
Dance, Girl, Dance is a film released in 1940 and directed by Dorothy Arzner.[1][2] In 2007, Dance, Girl, Dance was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant", describing it as Arzner's "most intriguing film" and a "meditation on the disparity between art and commerce. The dancers, played by Maureen O'Hara and Lucille Ball, strive to preserve their own feminist integrity, while fighting for their place in the spotlight and for the love of male lead Louis Hayward."[3] Dance, Girl, Dance was edited by Robert Wise, whose next film as editor was Citizen Kane and who later won Oscars as director of West Side Story and The Sound of Music.
Too Many Girls is a 1940 American musical comedy film directed by George Abbott, written by John Twist, and starring Lucille Ball, Richard Carlson, Ann Miller, Eddie Bracken, Frances Langford, Desi Arnaz and Hal Le Roy. It was released on October 8, 1940, by RKO Pictures.[1][2][3] Both Desi Arnaz and Lucille Ball credited the production for bringing them together. They married on November 30, 1940, less than two months after the film's release.
Too Many Girls
A Girl, a Guy, and a Gob
A Girl, a Guy and a Gob is a 1941 film produced by Harold Lloyd and starring George Murphy, Lucille Ball, and Edmond O'Brien. Steve is a shy quiet man who is an executive for a shipping firm. He meets Dot at the Opera where she had his seats and the next day she shows up as his temporary secretary. Then Coffee Cup comes to town to see Dot, his gal. When Steven is with Cecilia, everything is boring. When he is with Dot and Coffee Cup, everything is exciting and he falls for Dot. But Coffee is getting out of the Navy in a few days and he plans to marry Dot.
Look Who's Laughing is a 1941 film from RKO Radio Pictures. The film is built around a number of sitcom characters from the Golden Age of Radio and centers around a radio personality who plans to build an airplane plant in a small town. This film is followed by Here We Go Again.
Look Who's Laughing
Valley of the Sun
1942 - In 1868, Army scout Johnny Ware is courtmartialed for helping Indians against their white oppressors, but escapes and finds himself in the hamlet of Desert Center. There, he crosses paths with Christine Larson who is about to marry one of the crooked Indian agents...but not if Johnny can help it. The film lapses frequently into comedy, with an action climax as our hero tries to head off an incipient Indian war.
The Big Street is a 1942 American drama film starring Henry Fonda and Lucille Ball, based on the short story "Little Pinks" by Damon Runyon, who also produced the movie. The film was directed by Irving Reis. The screenplay was written by Leonard Spigelgass from Runyon's story.
The Big Street
Seven Days' Leave
The Big Street is a 1942 American drama film starring Henry Fonda and Lucille Ball, based on the short story "Little Pinks" by Damon Runyon, who also produced the movie. The film was directed by Irving Reis. The screenplay was written by Leonard Spigelgass from Runyon's story.
Best Foot Forward is a 1943 American musical film adapted from the 1941 Broadway musical comedy of the same title. The film was released by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, directed by Edward Buzzell, and starred Lucille Ball, William Gaxton, Virginia Weidler, Chill Wills, June Allyson, Gloria DeHaven, and Nancy Walker. The actors did their own singing, except for Lucille Ball, whose singing was dubbed by Gloria Grafton; Virginia Weidler, whose singing was dubbed by Jeanne Darrell; and Jack Jordan, whose singing was dubbed by Ralph Blane. Weidler, then 16 years old, retired from acting after this film was made, making Best Foot Forward her final screen appearance.
Best Foot Forward
DuBarry Was a Lady
Du Barry Was a Lady is a 1943 American musical comedy film, starring Red Skelton, Lucille Ball, Gene Kelly and Tommy Dorsey and his Orchestra. It is based on the 1939 stage musical of the same name. Shot in Technicolor, the film was directed by Roy Del Ruth and produced and distributed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.
Thousands Cheer is a 1943 American musical comedy film directed by George Sidney and released by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Produced at the height of the Second World War, the film was intended as a morale booster for American troops and their families.
Thousands Cheer
Meet the People
Meet the People (1944) is a Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer musical comedy film made, and set, during World War II, and starring Lucille Ball and Dick Powell and featuring Virginia O'Brien, Bert Lahr, Rags Ragland and June Allyson. The film takes its title from a successful Los Angeles musical revue, which ran on Broadway from December 25, 1939 to May 10, 1941. Vaughn Monroe and his orchestra, Spike Jones and his City Slickers, and Virginia O'Brien were also in the original stage cast. O'Brien sings the hit song "Say We're Sweethearts Again".
Without Love is a 1945 romantic comedy film starring Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn, based on a 1942 play by Philip Barry. The film was directed by Harold S. Bucquet from a screenplay by Donald Ogden Stewart. Lucille Ball also stars in the film.
Without Love
Abbott and Costello in Hollywood
Abbott and Costello in Hollywood (on screen title Bud Abbott and Lou Costello in Hollywood) is a 1945 black-and-white comedy film from Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, produced by Martin A. Gosch, directed by S. Sylvan Simon, that stars the comedy team of Abbott and Costello. Many stars appear in the film as themselves, such as Lucille Ball, Rags Ragland, Preston Foster, and a young Dean Stockwell.
Ziegfeld Follies is a 1945 American musical comedy film released by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, and directed by Lemuel Ayers, Roy Del Ruth, Robert Lewis, Vincente Minnelli, Merrill Pye, George Sidney, and Charles Walters. It stars many of MGM leading talents, including Fred Astaire, Lucille Ball, Lucille Bremer, Fanny Brice (the only member of the ensemble who was a star of the original Follies), Judy Garland, Kathryn Grayson, Lena Horne, Gene Kelly, James Melton, Victor Moore, William Powell, Red Skelton, and Esther Williams. Producer Arthur Freed wanted to create a film along the lines of the Ziegfeld Follies Broadway shows, and so, the film is composed of a sequence of unrelated lavish musical numbers and comedy sketches. Filmed in 1944, 1945 and 1946,[3] it was released in 1946, to considerable critical and box-office success.
Ziegfeld Follies
The Dark Corner
The Dark Corner is a 1946 black-and-white film noir directed by Henry Hathaway starring Lucille Ball, Mark Stevens and Clifton Webb.
Two Smart People is a 1946 American film directed by Jules Dassin, and starring Lucille Ball and John Hodiak, Lloyd Nolan and Hugo Haas. Ace Connors (John Hodiak) is a con man who has half a million dollars in bonds hidden in a cookbook. When he tries to sell a bogus oil investment to Dwight Chadwick (Lloyd Corrigan) at a Beverly Hills hotel, Dwight's attractive friend, Ricki Woodner (Lucille Ball), intervenes with a scam of her own.
Two Smart People
Easy to Wed
Easy to Wed is a 1946 Technicolor American musical comedy film directed by Edward Buzzell and starring Van Johnson, Esther Williams, Lucille Ball, and Keenan Wynn. The screenplay by Dorothy Kingsley is an adaptation of the screenplay of the 1936 film Libeled Lady by Maurine Dallas Watkins, Howard Emmett Rogers, and George Oppenheimer.
Lured is a 1947 film noir directed by Douglas Sirk and starring George Sanders, Lucille Ball, Charles Coburn, and Boris Karloff.[2] The film is a remake of Robert Siodmak's 1939 French film Pieges (titled Personal Column in the United States).
Lured
Her Husband's Affairs
Her Husband's Affairs is a 1947 American romantic comedy film, directed by S. Sylvan Simon for Columbia Pictures. It stars Lucille Ball, Franchot Tone, and Edward Everett Horton.
Sorrowful Jones, also known as Damon Runyon's Sorrowful Jones, is a 1949 film directed by Sidney Lanfield. The film stars Lucille Ball and Bob Hope. Sorrowful Jones was a remake of a 1934 Shirley Temple film, Little Miss Marker. In the film, a young girl is left with the notoriously cheap Sorrowful Jones (Hope) as a marker for a bet. When her father does not return, he learns that taking care of a child interferes with his free-wheeling lifestyle. Lucille Ball plays a nightclub singer who is dating Sorrowful's boss. Ball's singing voice is provided by Annette Warren, who also sang for her in Fancy Pants and later provided the singing voice for Ava Gardner in Show Boat.
Sorrowful Jones
Miss Grant Takes Richmond
Miss Grant Takes Richmond is a 1949 comedy film starring Lucille Ball and William Holden, directed by Lloyd Bacon and released by Columbia Pictures. It was released under the title Innocence is Bliss in the UK.
Easy Living is a 1949 American drama film directed by Jacques Tourneur, starring Victor Mature, Lizabeth Scott and Lucille Ball.[1] The film features the real-life Los Angeles Rams football team.
Easy Living
A Woman of Distinction
A Woman of Distinction is a 1950 American romantic comedy film directed by Edward Buzzell. It stars Rosalind Russell and Ray Milland. Lucille Ball as herself.
Fancy Pants is a 1950 American Technicolor romantic comedy film, directed by George Marshall starring Lucille Ball and Bob Hope. It is a musical adaptation of Ruggles of Red Gap.
Fancy Pants
The Fuller Brush Girl
The Fuller Brush Girl is a 1950 slapstick comedy starring Lucille Ball and directed by Lloyd Bacon. Animator Frank Tashlin wrote the script. Ball plays a quirky door-to-door cosmetics saleswoman for the Fuller Brush Company. The film also stars Eddie Albert and has an uncredited cameo by Red Skelton (who had starred in the Tashlin-scripted The Fuller Brush Man two years earlier).
The Magic Carpet is a 1951 American adventure film directed by Lew Landers and written by David Mathews. The film stars Lucille Ball, John Agar, Patricia Medina, George Tobias, Raymond Burr, Gregory Gaye, Rick Vallin and Gary Klein. The film was released on October 18, 1951, by Columbia Pictures.[1][2] The film opened in Los Angeles on October 18, 1951, three days after I Love Lucy premiered.
The Magic Carpet
"I Love Lucy", aka "I Love Lucy: The Movie"
1953 - Desi Arnaz greets the "I Love Lucy" studio audience and invites them to watch Lucille Ball and the cast film a special extended episode.
The Long, Long Trailer is a 1954 American Anscocolor comedy film based on a novel of the same name written by Clinton Twiss in 1951 about a couple who buy a new travel trailer home and spend a year traveling across the United States.[3] The film stars Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz. It also features Marjorie Main, Keenan Wynn, Bert Freed, Moroni Olsen, Gladys Hurlbut, Madge Blake, Howard McNear, and Walter Baldwin. The picture was directed by Vincente Minnelli, working from a screenplay by Albert Hackett and Frances Goodrich.
The Long, Long Trailer
Forever, Darling
Forever, Darling is a 1956 Eastman Color American romantic comedy film with fantasy overtones, starring Lucille Ball, Desi Arnaz, and James Mason, directed by Alexander Hall and released by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. The original screenplay is by Helen Deutsch and focuses on a married couple whose troubled marriage is saved with the help of a guardian angel.
The Facts of Life is a 1960 romantic comedy starring Bob Hope and Lucille Ball as married people who have an affair. Written, directed, and produced by the longtime Hope associates Melvin Frank and Norman Panama, it was more serious than many other contemporary Hope vehicles. The film was nominated for five Academy Awards, winning one for Costume Design (for Edith Head and Edward Stevenson). For her performance, Lucille Ball was nominated for a Golden Globe for Best Actress – Comedy. The film features an opening animated title sequence created by Saul Bass. Thirteen years later, Frank directed and co-wrote A Touch of Class, which likewise dealt with a middle-aged couple trying to have an affair, centering on a disaster-laden trip to a place where they wouldn't be recognized. However, it has never been considered an outright remake.
The Facts of Life
Critic's Choice
Critic's Choice is a 1963 comedy film directed by Don Weis. Based on the 1960 Broadway play of the same name by Ira Levin, the movie starred Bob Hope and Lucille Ball and included Rip Torn, Marilyn Maxwell, Jim Backus, Marie Windsor and Jerome Cowan in the cast. This was the last of four films that Hope and Ball made together.
A Guide for the Married Man is a 1967 American bedroom farce comedy film starring Walter Matthau, Robert Morse, and Inger Stevens. It was directed by Gene Kelly. It features a large number of cameos, including Lucille Ball, Jack Benny, Terry-Thomas, Jayne Mansfield, Sid Caesar, Carl Reiner, Joey Bishop, Art Carney and Wally Cox. The title song, performed by The Turtles, was composed by John Williams with lyrics by Leslie Bricusse.
A Guide for the Married Man
Yours, Mine and Ours
Yours, Mine and Ours is a 1968 American family comedy film directed by Melville Shavelson and starring Lucille Ball, Henry Fonda and Van Johnson. Before its release, it had three other working titles: The Beardsley Story, Full House, and His, Hers, and Theirs. It was based loosely on the story of Frank and Helen Beardsley, although Desilu Productions bought the rights to the story long before Helen's autobiographical book Who Gets the Drumstick? was released to bookstores. Screenwriters Madelyn Pugh and Bob Carroll wrote several I Love Lucy-style stunts that in most cases had no basis in the actual lives of the Beardsley family, before Melville Shavelson and Mort Lachman took over primary writing duties. The film was commercially successful, and even the Beardsleys themselves appreciated it
Mame is a 1974 Technicolor musical film in Panavision based on the 1966 Broadway musical of the same name (itself based on the 1958 film Auntie Mame) and the 1955 novel Auntie Mame by Patrick Dennis. It was directed by Gene Saks, and adapted by Paul Zindel, and starred Lucille Ball in her final theatrical film performance. The cast also stars Bea Arthur, Bruce Davison, and Robert Preston. The story focuses on the madcap life of Mame Dennis (Ball), which is disrupted when she becomes the guardian of her deceased brother's son. She marries a wealthy Southern plantation owner (Preston), is widowed, yet through it all, with the help of her dearest friend, Vera Charles (Arthur), manages to keep things under control.
Mame

Make sure to check out the new...

Funko POP!

Starting at
$10.59
each

Shop Now

2018 Christmas Ornament

Take a look at our collection of over 40 Christmas items!

Shop Now

Our Top 10!

Our Top 10 most ordered items.

Shop Now

Don't forget to check out our fan posts on Facebook!

Visit Now!
Lucy Comes Home